feminist-friendly fantasy fiction

Submitted by Reena Bhogal

Crimson Tears

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

Faith is the heroine of this story, she is the lost Princess of the Home Realms and we see as her life is thrown into complete chaos. She discovers she is not who she thought she was and can no longer trust family, friends, or even her own mind. She is told a prophecy exists involving a saviour child she must bear, and soon discover she has telepathic powers. Faith finds strength and falls in love with her Protector, Jay, who she is forbidden to love. When Faith finally confronts the evil that infects her true home, she must find the strength and belief from within to fight it. I found it extremely difficult to put this book down. It left me captivated with Faith’s story. The author takes you on a wonderful journey which left me wanting more.

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Submitted by Keri

Finding Meara

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

I love the strong-willed main character in this book. Hazel has doubts and sometimes struggles with doing the right thing, but in the end she faces her fears to help others. There’s a bit of romance, but I found it realistic and not too cheesy, and it doesn’t overshadow the main plot at all. It’s an easy read- fast-paced & full of action. I do wish the other characters were developed a bit (like Tavi!) but maybe they will be in later books in the series.

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Submitted by G.G. Donnahue

The Emperor’s Dragon Pt. 1

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

A combination of Douglas Adams humor and Anne Rice tension, THE EMPEROR’S DRAGON PT.1 is a new scifi novella that brings women’s issues to light through an imaginative exploration of gender reversal. Ito was a tough martial artist from the wrong side of the streets whose unique abilities should have seen him become the world’s first super hero. Instead he’s tied up in a cargo bay, headed for the other half of the universe where people like him (male and female alike) are treated like lavish arm candy for the powerful and rich.  But before his captors can get him there disaster strikes, and Ito’s life is left hanging in the balance. Will they be able to reach the Doctor in time? And if so what will the Doc discover that changes the stakes entirely?

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Submitted by Keri

Gilded

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

Jae Hwa is a Korean-American teenage girl who just moved back to Seoul, South Korea with her father after her mother’s death. She learns that her family has been targeted by a Korean god for generations, and that she’s next. Trained in traditional Korean archery and Tae Kwon Do, she’s determined to fight back against the gods and her fate. Jae is an awesome female character and this is a great story that weaves Korean mythology with modern-day fantasy!

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Submitted by Rachel Fish

The Wee Free Men

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

“Another world is colliding with this one,” said the toad. “All the monsters are coming back.” “Why?” said Tiffany. “There’s no one to stop them.” There was silence for a moment. Then Tiffany said, “There’s me.” Armed only with a frying pan and her common sense, Tiffany Aching, a young witch-to-be, is all that stands between the monsters of Fairyland and the warm, green Chalk country that is her home. Forced into Fairyland to seek her kidnapped brother, Tiffany allies herself with the Chalk’s local Nac Mac Feegle – aka the Wee Free Men – a clan of sheep-stealing, sword-wielding, six-inch-high blue men who are as fierce as they are funny. Together they battle through an eerie and ever-shifting landscape, fighting brutal flying fairies, dream-spinning dromes, and grimhounds – black dogs with eyes of fire and teeth of razors – before ultimately confronting the Queen of the Elves, absolute ruler […]

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Submitted by Alex

Under the Dragon’s Claw

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

Alex creates a world in which the women ‘players’ are every bit as lethal and daring as the men –and in some cases more so! We fall in love with Adelayne, admire Roxette’s intuition, and admire Miranda’s courage and tenacity.

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Submitted by Katie Lynn Johnson

Amulet of Elusion (The Lost Amulet Chronicles, #1)

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

The protagonist, Alexa Costa, and her guardian, Ivy are confident and clever, as well as skilled in swordplay and shooting. A minor character, Sophie, is an excellent markswoman as well as a scholar. The antagonist, Queen Jada, is also skilled in weaponry and is incredibly cunning. The second protagonist, Caleb Whitman, greatly respects women and loves Alexa for her wild spirit. Several of the fictional countries in the story are named for women, including Netira, Minako, and Andina.

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Submitted by Elyse Salpeter

THE HUNT FOR XANADU

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

This novel is about twenty-two year old Kelsey Porter who has dedicated her life to avenging the death of her parents, murdered in their quest to find the mystical land of Xanadu. Before she can locate the murderers, she has to discover their motives for the brutal crime and finds herself at the epicenter of a Buddhist mystery as old as time. With the help of her companion, Detective Desmond Gisborne, she hunts the killers across the globe and discovers a darkness in her spiritual past that tests the very limits of her soul. Soon she realizes that it is not she who is doing the hunting, but the one being hunted. Kelsey must find a way to survive, while ancient demons attempt to destroy her.

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Submitted by K. C. May

The Kinshield Legacy

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

There’s an entire guild of women warriors who fight for justice, protect families from attacking monsters, and don’t put up with people who try to intimidate them or “put them in their place.” Two of them are featured as major characters in the novel.

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

SM Reine is great about writing well-rounded female characters. The main character, Elise, defies pretty much every stereotype about women. She’s a super-strong warrior who kicks ass but really lacks in emotional maturity (for good reason considering the way she was raised). There are lots of other well-written female characters, including Stephanie, a witch and doctor. I also love how diverse the characters are. There are people from all over the world in these books.

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