feminist-friendly fantasy fiction

Submitted by Hart St. Martin

Fractured: Lisen of Solsta Book 1

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

The world in which the main character finds herself after being spirited away from earth has never known sexism–no division of labor, no stereotypical gender-based roles, etc. Plus, both men and women can carry babies to term. Need I say more?

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Submitted by Christine Butler

Winter’s Reach

This book is feminist-friendly because:

A multi-viewpoint story of political intrigue in a pseudo-Renaissance fantasy world, this series so far is ultimately about several women in very different walks of life (a pope’s daughter, a barmaid, a bounty hunter and a witch) dealing with the constraints of a patriarchal society and finding, in their own styles, ways of surmounting the obstacles in their path. The story’s women have agency, they’re free to make bold choices (and mistakes), and there’s a lot of subtext here. One of the villains, the Owl, is horrifying, but all of her actions come from a very human place of anger and grief. Meanwhile, one of the male characters is a Nice Guy who commits a horrible violation upon one of the leads (not rape — no rape in this series so far, thank God) in the belief that he’s “helping” and knows what’s best for her. (And in another situation, […]

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Submitted by Alyssa

Uprooted

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

Drawing inspiration from Beauty and the Beast, the beast in Uprooted is a powerful magician, the heroine a super-powerful witch in her own right, and they are not only love interests, but equals in many ways! Agnieszka is a fantastically complex character who submits to no one and does her share of traditionally male assigned fairy-tale rescuing. Add in a strong sisterly friendship that carries through the narrative, an awesome female sword-forging POC, physicality that is consensual (and the stopping of it when it isn’t), and a villain who is magical, female, and entirely creepy, yet also a complicated character and you’ll get the feminist fantasy I didn’t know I was looking for!

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Submitted by Emily June Street

The Gantean

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

The Gantean offers a whole new scope for a “strong female lead,” forging a new path for a heroine rather than a hero. Narrated in the first person, The Gantean shows us the inside of a heroine’s mind as she negotiates a woman’s difficulties in a complex world. A celebration of the mystic feminine!

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Submitted by Brett

The Gate to Women’s Country

This book is feminist-friendly because:

“Set in a post-holocaust feminist dystopia that offers only two political alternatives: a repressive polygamist sect that is slowly self-destructing through inbreeding and the matriarchal dictatorship called Women’s Country. Here, in a desperate effort to prevent another world war, the women have segregated most men into closed military garrisons and have taken on themselves every other function of government, industry, agriculture, science and learning.”

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Submitted by Katrina

The Invisible Library

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

he primary setting of the series seems to be a mysterious Library – a place that is all about finding “unique works of fiction and saving them in a place out of time and space”. The Library is treated as its own world, with its own laws and regulations, social hierarchy, treaties and agreements, and its own language. The protagonist, Irene, is a bisexual librarian spy turned detective whose job is to jump across alternative worlds and retrieve rare works of fiction for the Library. The book features rich worldbuildiong with characters of many races, professions and sexualities. It’s the first in a series that promise to deliver more noir librarian mysteries set in steampunk-y alternative worlds. Our main character has a strong sense of duty which conflicts with her desire to solve mysteries and learn more about the Library. The seeds of this conflict are planted in this first […]

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Submitted by Becca

The Honours

This book is feminist-friendly because:

The Honours doesn’t really fit into any categories. It’s a bit Lovecraft, a bit English folk horror, a bit school girl adventure. In fact the author has provided a tongue in cheek approved list of genres http://www.timclarepoet.co.uk/?p=2628 Set in the 1930s in a stately home in the east of England, Delphine, the 13 year old protagonist, has joined her parents living in some kind of commune. She is lonely, ignored and desperately trying to help her father who is suffering from PTSD since WW1. Delphine discovers tunnels under the house and overhears all kinds of things that make no sense to her. There are inexplicable & terrifying “things” living in the woods and whispers of a coming war but only the game keeper shares Delphine’s concerns. Delphine herself is great: fierce, always brave despite her terror, intelligent, resourceful, but desperately lonely. She’s also a crack shot with any antique firearm […]

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Submitted by B. Lynch

King Callie

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

It’s about a teenage girl rising to a traditionally male position of power, and how her mother and other allies have to navigate a treacherous power struggle – but beyond that, it features a sizeable number of women as main characters and doesn’t force them to be good or evil, or portray them in a shining light. They are flawed, well-fleshed out women, and they do and act on what they feel is best for their country or personal interests. They are not paragons, or tropes; they are women with agency.

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Submitted by Elyse Salpeter

The Quest of the Empty Tomb

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

This book is #2 in the Kelsey Porter series, a series about a brilliant and resourceful young woman who must confront her spiritual past to help solve problems in her present life.

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Submitted by Jon

Favorite Child

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

I have read several literature in relation to gender equality. But this is my first time reading a story in relation to gender roles or gender equality that is based on the Asian culture and practices. I hope this story will be a reminder or eye opener about how people are at times being treated according to their gender.

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