feminist-friendly fantasy fiction

Submitted by João Cerqueira

The Tragedy of Fidel Castro

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

Fátima is the woman who talks to God and who convinces Jesus to return to earth to defuse the conflict between JFK and Castro.

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

My thoughts on heroines: http://itsanightmare.blogspot.com/2014/09/my-kick-ass-heroine-just-wants-to-be.html Book 2 out in Feb 2015! An Amazon reader review: 5.0 out of 5 stars breath-stealing masterpiece October 26, 2014 By Merrick Hansen Format:Paperback This novel has me hooked. Quinn manages to take science fiction and fantasy, familiar post-apocalyptic themes, and blend them into something indescribably breathtaking. It’s like a trip down the rabbit hole. The very first scene had my heart pounding, and I don’t think that feeling subsided. I read this all in one day and I feel like I’m still lingering in the world Quinn so masterfully created. Honestly more fantastic than the more popular YA series I have read and scene turned into movies, I hope Quinn’s series garners so much more attention and soon. I feel honored to have read this novel and I’ll be spreading it like wildfire! This world of dreams and nightmares is absolutely unforgettable.

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Submitted by Sarah Remy

Stonehill Downs

STONEHILL

This book is feminist-friendly because:

STONEHILL DOWNS introduces AVANI, an orphaned hedge witch making a life for herself in a foreign land. She’s self-confidant, stubborn, fallible, and human – just like any other good fantasy protagonist.

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Submitted by Rhonda Porrett

In the Skin of a Nunqua

In-the-Skin-of-a-Nunqua-Ebook

This book is feminist-friendly because:

Shanti distinguishes herself as a competent leader in a man’s world, but she soon realizes that other women achieve success without first having to prove their worth. As the author, much of this story is my fight against the usual female tropes of fantasy. Shanti battles the coming-of-age princess with magical powers whom she deems unfit to rule, AND she battles a woman who’s more interested in looking like a warrior than being one.

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Submitted by Randal Svea

Diary of a Wizard Princess

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

Nearly every page passes the Bechdel test with flying colors. The Land of Princesses is a pink-and-purple, pony-infested wasteland where every girl is royalty, for all the good it does them. Meet Brigid, an underachiever sent off to a bottom-tier boarding school that “teaches the controversy” over science vs. sorcery. There she makes a few friends and a terrible enemy, an enemy so terrible that he can’t seem to stay away from his old school, and is thwarted by someone too young to have a driver’s license. That’s how terrible this enemy is. Thrill to a tale of swords & sorcery, dueling & delinquency, and napping & necromancy.

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Submitted by Keri

Premonitions

Premonitions-Jamie-Schultz

This book is feminist-friendly because:

“Premonitions” kicks the Bechdel test’s ass- and then some. The book is full of well-rounded female characters, straight & lesbian, includes a lesbian relationship, and a racially diverse cast as well, with black and Asian main characters. I LOVED this book. The way that Karyn’s psychic abilities are described was very evocative- it felt like watching a horror movie. I loved the very diverse cast of characters and how all of them had their own distinct personality, backstory, and motivations. My favorite character was actually the “bad guy,” Enoch Sobell :) The plot had great pacing: it was fast-moving and full of action, but still left time for character development. I HIGHLY recommend this book to anyone who likes urban paranormal/fantasy/spec-fic and diverse, well-developed characters. I can’t wait till the next one comes out!!

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Submitted by Katrina

God’s War

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

As it can be gathered from the title, religion is a big theme in this book. As far as I understand, Umayma – the planet where the book takes place – is colonised by Muslims, judging by several mentions of mosques, traditional clothes and set prayer hours. I am not an expert on Theology however, so my sincerest apologies if I am wrong. To Nyxnissa or Nyx, however, religion matters very little. She is a Bel Dame – a lady bounty hunter paid to collect the heads of deserters. And she’s the deadliest of them all – her numerous young lovers can attest to that. She is a citizen of Nasheen, a country where matriarchy prevails and women are the ones participating in violent things that (for some ungodly reason) are still viewed as masculine in our world. Nasheenian ladies show, quite correctly, that “she who fights like a girl” […]

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Submitted by Harley Shaffer

Ange’el

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This book is feminist-friendly because:

This book is a powerful essay on nature versus nurture disguised as a well-accomplished romantic novel. Are our behaviors and traits defined by our genes or by our education and environment? The novel does not answer the question, but it does make a very strong case that every time we blame our genes we limit our potential and excuse bad behavior. An inclusive book with characters that are varied in race, sexual orientation and non stereotypical when it comes to their gender.

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Submitted by Kat Deuchars

Best Served Cold

best-served-cold-feminist-fantasy

This book is feminist-friendly because:

I would recommend this book to anyone but especially anyone looking for a strong female protagonist, who is an antihero. If you think Brienne of Tarth, Arya Stark and Daenerys are badass, you haven’t seen anything yet. The main character, Monza Murcatto, is a flawed, ruthless and vicious mercenary with a talent for manipulation. And she isn’t the only well-rounded female character. There’s a mother-of-3 torturer, a voraciously hungry poisoner, an almost-magical ninja, a lesbian queen and a spy hiding in the guise of a mistress. The main plot revolves around revenge (as might be guessed from the title) but a lot of time is also dedicated to what makes a good leader, how to be a good person in a violent world and the politics of warring city-states (it’s very reminiscent of Renaissance Italy and Germany). Although homosexuality of both kinds and incest are referred to, the main sexual […]

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Submitted by KeriLynn Engel

Child of a Hidden Sea

child-of-a-hidden-sea

This book is feminist-friendly because:

[The publisher provided me with an ARC of this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.] I LOVED this book- flawless! Sophie Hansa is the perfect example of how a you can have a strong female character who doesn’t literally kick ass. She’s a complex, believable character who develops and grows though the story to be able to face her fears. I love her unique background as a marine videographer and how she uses her education, curiosity, and quick thinking to solves the puzzles the plot presents. The cast of characters includes several well-developed and believable female and male characters, and definitely passes the Bechdel test hands-down. It also has a diverse cast with POC main characters and tackles issues like homophobia. The worldbuilding was also phenomenal, very unique. I loved the city made of a fleet of ships, and Sophie’s questions about the logistics of such a […]

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